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Gerald's Chocolate Fudge Recipe

Updated November 8, 2017

Gerald's Chocolate Fudge Recipe

Are you looking for an old-time chocolate fudge recipe like Grandpa used to make?  Then you have come to the right place!

Imagine rich chocolate and sweet creaminess slipping across your lips and tantalizing your taste buds--irresistible!

Addictive?  You bet!

Die hard chocoholics love it!

You will, too, as it is naturally gluten-free.  This heirloom chocolate fudge recipe is extra special, because it originates from historic pre-corn syrup days.  That means it is awesomely corn-free!

Please welcome D.R. Fitzgerald, a highly regarded staff member at GlutenFreeHomemade.com as he shares a wonderful family recipe.


The Story Behind Gerald's Chocolate Fudge Recipe

"This chocolate fudge recipe is dedicated to my father Gerald.

He grew up during the depression on a farm in upstate Vermont.  His family raised dairy cows and gathered sap from their maple sugar orchard.  They used the milk as a staple and sold the milk and separated cream for profit.  The maple sap was boiled down in large kettles until it became syrup.  The family also boiled down some of the syrup to make maple sugar for their own needs.

From the time I was in kindergarten until high school, Dad worked the swing shift (nights) as a vertical mill operator.  The plant where he worked produced hydraulic cylinders.  He loved to hunt and fish and while pursuing his hobbies, he would often fill his pocket with a few pieces of his homemade fudge.

As a young boy, I loved to go anywhere with my Dad.  Since he was always working or sleeping when I was awake, I took every opportunity to spend time with him.

One rainy Saturday we drove out to what is known as the Tillamook Burn in the northern Coast Range in Oregon, USA.  The Tillamook Burn area is a result of several large fires that burned between 1933 and 1951 destroying an area of 350,000 acres.  The area was covered with huge stumps that might at one time have been old growth trees rivaling the Redwoods along California's northern coast. This area, located between Portland, Oregon and the Pacific Ocean beaches, is largely overgrown today.

Our trek there was a preliminary trip to determine where deer were congregating prior to hunting season.

The night before our trip, Dad made a batch of his chocolate fudge recipe with walnuts and raisins.  I wasn’t fond of raisins, so I took my own snacks.  The next morning we set off before dawn in his old 1952 red Chevrolet pickup truck.

We spent the day traipsing through the rain and fog, and tramping up and down brush clogged ravines.  We would return to the truck to dry out, now and then, before moving on to explore another spot.

Late in the afternoon, Dad had one more stop he wanted to make.  I sat in the truck and watched him disappear down a hill.  The area was still covered by fog making me feel safely enclosed.  The day had been quiet; we hadn’t seen a single other person.

I sat in the truck for some time obeying my orders to remain inside.  I soon started to become hungry and eyed Dad’s bag of chocolate fudge he had left behind.  It was safely left behind knowing that I did not like raisins.

Soon Dad returned, rising up the hillside from out of the fog.  Wet, again, he slid into the driver's seat. Then he reached for the bag of fudge, only to find it filled with raisins.

He said not a word, but slowly backed the truck onto the road.

I was dead where I sat with no one else to blame.

With a handful of raisins, he looked over at me and laughed.  “Thanks for leaving me something,” he said.

Dad never measured the ingredients when making his chocolate fudge recipe.

When trying to recreate his chocolate fudge as I remember, I had to guess and estimate until I had a chocolate fudge recipe that could be followed by the rest of us.

A large saucepan will work, but a large pan with deep sides, like a Dutch oven works best.

Fudge is sensitive to temperature differences as little as 2 degrees, so I highly recommend using a candy thermometer.

Alternatively, you can drop a small amount of hot fudge into a cup of very cold water until it reaches soft ball stage (see Candy Making Tips).

I find if I place a wire rack in the bottom of a the kitchen sink and fill it with a few inches of water, then place the hot saucepan or Dutch oven in the water,  that it will cool more quickly.

Use a pan with sides, such as a square cake pan, lined with buttered foil to pour the chocolate fudge recipe into."

--D.R. Fizgerald






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Gerald's Chocolate Fudge Recipe


By

Gerald's Chocolate Fudge Recipe


Rich, dark and chocolately! No chocoholic can resist this creamy confection!

Yield: 64, 1 inch squares

Ingredients:
- 3 cups granulated white sugar
- 1/3 cup cocoa powder (or 2/3 cup gluten-free semi-sweet chocolate chips)
- 1/8 teaspoon salt
- 1 1/2 cups cream or whole milk
- 1/4 cup butter
- 2 teaspoons gluten-free vanilla extract
- 1/2 cup chopped nuts of your choice (walnuts, pecans or hazelnuts) or Gerald's favorite, raisins

Instructions:
1. Grease a large piece of foil with softened butter.
2. Line an 8 inch square cake pan with the buttered foil, and then set aside.
3. In a large saucepan with deep sides or a Dutch Oven, mix together sugar, cocoa powder and salt.
4. Add milk and stir in gently; the mixture will combine as it heats through.
5. Over medium heat, stir constantly with a wooden spoon, scraping extra cocoa and sugar from the bottom of the pan, until mixture comes to a rolling boil.
6. Remove the spoon and attach a candy thermometer to the side of the pan so the bulb rests in the liquid mixture, not the foam, and does not touch the bottom or sides of the pan.
7. The mixture will expand in height as it boils and may appear to boil over; DO NOT STIR, reduce heat or remove pan from heat!
8. Continue to cook until mixture reaches 230°F; for a harder, crumblier texture, continue cooking until mixture reaches 238°F.
9. Remove from heat.
10. Add butter, vanilla extract, nuts or raisins; DO NOT STIR!
11. Let cool until mixture reaches 150°F, about 20 minutes at room temperature, or cool candy mixture quickly by placing the pan in an ice water bath; change the water as it becomes warm.
12. Using a wooden spoon, stir vigorously with constant motion until mixture loses its shine, just begins to thicken and turn creamy.*
13. Work quickly to pour fudge into a prepared pan.
14. Cut into pieces while still warm.
15. Let fudge cool completely to set up.
16. Tightly wrap individual pieces in waxed paper or plastic wrap and store inside an air tight container in a cool dry place.

*NOTE: If you stir too long, then you will be unable to pour it. It still tastes great all the same (see Candy Making Tips).

Tags:
Gluten-free, Corn-free, Egg-free, Soy-free, Vegetarian



Variation

Metric Measurements

Note:  use volume-based imperial/metric measuring spoons and dry measuring cups marked in milliliters; see Kitchen Equipment and Tools.

Ingredients

  • 750 ml granulated white sugar
  • 85 ml cocoa powder (or 170 ml gluten-free semi-sweet chocolate chips)
  • 0.5 ml salt
  • 375 ml cream or whole milk
  • 60 ml butter
  • 10 ml gluten-free vanilla extract
  • 125 ml chopped nuts of your choice (walnuts, pecans or hazelnuts) or Gerald's favorite, raisins 

Instructions

  1. Grease a large piece of foil with softened butter.
  2. Line an 20 cm x 20 cm baking pan or dish with the buttered foil, and then set aside.
  3. In a large saucepan with deep sides or a Dutch oven, mix together sugar, cocoa powder and salt.
  4. Add milk and stir in gently; the mixture will combine as it heats through.
  5. Over medium heat, stir constantly with a wooden spoon, scraping extra cocoa and sugar from the bottom of the pan, until mixture comes to a rolling boil.
  6. Remove the spoon and attach a candy thermometer to the side of the pan so the bulb rests in the liquid mixture, not the foam, and does not touch the bottom or sides of the pan.
  7. The mixture will expand in height as it boils and may "appear" to boil over; DO NOT STIR, reduce heat or remove pan from heat.
  8. Continue to cook until mixture reaches 110°C; for a harder, crumblier texture, continue cooking until mixture reaches 114°C.
  9. Remove from heat.
  10. Add butter, vanilla extract, nuts or raisins; DO NOT STIR!
  11. Let cool until mixture reaches 66°C, about 20 minutes at room temperature, or cool candy mixture quickly by placing the pan in an ice water bath; change the water as it becomes warm.
  12. Using a wooden spoon, stir vigorously with constant motion until mixture loses its shine, just begins to thicken and turn creamy.*
  13. Work quickly to pour fudge into a prepared pan.
  14. Cut into pieces while still warm.
  15. Let fudge cool completely to set up.
  16. Tightly wrap individual pieces in waxed paper or plastic wrap and store inside an air tight container in a cool dry place.

*Note:  If you stir too long, then you will be unable to pour it.  It still tastes great all the same (see Candy Making Tips).




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Grandpa's Marshmallow Recipe--Corn-free & Gluten-free

How to Make Homemade Candy Recipes




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